davisarms

This post is copied from Davis Arms facebook page. Arm KY is not responsible for any information or for the class itself.

Friday, February 19 2016, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM [EST]

Fish and Game Club Rd, London, KY, United States

The NRA Basic Pistol Course gives you an introduction to the care and shooting of handguns. It is one of several courses approved by the Kentucky State Government that can be used to get your concealed carry permit (CCDW). (YOU DO NOT HAVE TO TAKE ANY ADDITIONAL CLASSES TO GET YOUR CCDW) Once you receive your class completion certificate, you can apply for your CCDW with the State of Kentucky. You will receive the training and instruction you expect and pay for with us.

 

The class is 8 hours long and has live fire range time as required by the State of Kentucky. . The NRA Basic Pistol Course is for beginners to the experienced. You shoot your pistol at the range until you are comfortable and accurate with it.

 

Our classes are in London, Ky off of Hwy 80.

 

The cost is $65 and that includes range time. You will need to bring eye and ear protection, pistol, cleaning kit and normally 100 rounds of ammunition. 

 

Please register as soon as possible in order to reserve your seat. This also gives me time to get your classroom materials here available for you. Seats are limited. It is first come first serve. 

 

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to email, call us or message us on our Facebook page.

 

https://www.facebook.com/DavisArms

 

davisxarms@gmail.com 

 

606.312.5521

CCDW-SEAL

CCDW-SEALSo you’ve made the decision to get your CCDW. Well as of last year Kentucky has made it a bit quicker to get you out there carrying by offering their online application. I believe KY was the first to introduce this process and having gone through it myself I would like to share my experience. This process is significantly quicker than the paper process!

After you’ve taken the CCDW class you will receive a letter in the mail a few days to a few weeks later. This letter will contain your certificate of completion for your CCDW class. You will need to scan (or take a high-res photo) of this certificate for the online application.

To get to the online application page you will need to go to: https://kspportal.ky.gov/CCDW/Public/Login.aspx

On the application you will be asked to upload the certificate of completion and upload a photo for your permit. You will then pay the application fee of $40 + $10 (online application fee) and submit the form. You do have to pay an extra $10 (at the time I went through this, it may be more or less now) but it is a lot quicker. I received a reply saying that my license had been issued the same day, within a few hours at that!

This paper process can take a few months, and the online process can take as little as a few hours! This is a much better experience in my opinion. Granted, you will have to wait about a week to receive your permit (will arrive at your Sheriff’s dept.) but still you cut the time down to a fraction of what it would’ve taken had you mailed everything in. Once you permit arrives at the Sheriff’s department you will go into pick it up and pay the $20 fee to your Sheriff’s department.

The process was very smooth and I hope other states follow suit.

While searching the web I came across this video demonstrating the effectiveness of concealed carry. This video is a very good video and definitely worth the watch.

 

In the video you will see a group of citizens ranging in age and training, that all have their concealed carry and actively carry on a daily basis. In this video their skills are put to the test in an office environment. The are confronted with an active shooter and must use their skills to disable the shooter. For the most part they all did fairly well in the first scenario, however, the importance of Concealed Carry (vs open carry) is pointed out in the second scenario when one guy decides to open carry. He is made the first target.

There are a lot of people who open carry, and while I believe it has it’s place and time, I think concealed carry is the way to go.

Glovebox carry in KY is not concealed

Glovebox carry in KY is not concealed

Many people like to carry guns in their vehicle, however, many people do not because they think they are breaking the law. This is not the case in Kentucky. According to KRS 527.020 a gun can be carried (loaded or unloaded) within any manufacturer installed compartment of the vehicle and it will NOT be considered concealed. Here is the quoted text directly from the ky.gov website

A loaded or unloaded firearm or other deadly weapon shall not be deemed concealed on or about the person if it is located in any enclosed container, compartment, or storage space installed as original equipment in a motor vehicle by its manufacturer, including but not limited to a glove compartment, center console, or seat pocket, regardless of whether said enclosed container, storage space, or compartment is locked, unlocked, or does not have a locking mechanism.

Therefore if you are legally permitted to carry or posses a firearm in KY, then you can carry the gun in your glovebox without a ccdw permit.

The statute goes on to say that nobody can prohibit you from carrying a firearm in your vehicle. Read here:

No person or organization, public or private, shall prohibit a person from keeping a loaded or unloaded firearm or ammunition, or both, or other deadly weapon in a vehicle in accordance with the provisions of this subsection. Any attempt by a person or organization, public or private, to violate the provisions of this subsection may be the subject of an action for appropriate relief or for damages in a Circuit Court or District Court of competent jurisdiction. This subsection shall not apply

So you may also want to read the other article I have about employer’s prohibiting firearms on their property.

 

You can read this whole statute right here: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Statutes/statute.aspx?id=43448

 

Please keep in mind that the information posted in this article is not intended to be used as a legal reference and may not be 100% accurate. This article is just an opinion of the author.

 

 

The police really does not have much of a right to take your guns as long as you are not doing anything illegal or if the gun is not stolen. The KRS makes this pretty clear, if you are a law abiding citizen and you are not forbidden to posses a firearm, you should have no worries of the police, or government, taking your guns. See this quote from KRS 237.104

No person, unit of government, or governmental organization shall, during a period of disaster or emergency as specified in KRS Chapter 39A or at any other time, have the right to revoke, suspend, limit the use of, or otherwise impair the validity of the right of any person to purchase, transfer, loan, own, possess, carry, or use a firearm, firearm part, ammunition, ammunition component, or any deadly weapon or dangerous instrument.

So it’s simple, don’t do anything illegal with your firearm, don’t posses a stolen firearm and you have nothing to worry about!

See KRS 237.104 in it’s entirety here:

237.104 Rights to acquire, carry, and use deadly weapons not to be impaired — Seizure of deadly weapons prohibited — Application of section.

(1) No person, unit of government, or governmental organization shall, during a period of disaster or emergency as specified in KRS Chapter 39A or at any other time, have the right to revoke, suspend, limit the use of, or otherwise impair the validity of the right of any person to purchase, transfer, loan, own, possess, carry, or use a firearm, firearm part, ammunition, ammunition component, or any deadly weapon or dangerous instrument.

(2) No person, unit of government, or governmental organization shall, during a period of disaster or emergency as specified in KRS Chapter 39A or at any other time, take, seize, confiscate, or impound a firearm, firearm part, ammunition, ammunition component, or any deadly weapon or dangerous instrument from any person.

(3) The provisions of this section shall not apply to the taking of an item specified in subsection
(1) or (2) of this section from a person who is:
(a) Forbidden to possess a firearm pursuant to KRS 527.040;
(b) Forbidden to possess a firearm pursuant to federal law;
(c) Violating KRS 527.020;
(d) In possession of a stolen firearm;
(e) Using a firearm in the commission of a separate criminal offense; or
(f) Using a firearm or other weapon in the commission of an offense under KRS Chapter 150.

Effective: July 12, 2006 History: Created 2006 Ky. Acts ch. 240, sec. 7, effective July 12, 2006.

Please keep in mind that the information posted in this article is not intended to be used as a legal reference and may not be 100% accurate. This article is just an opinion of the author.

Employer doesn’t allow firearms on property and fired me for carrying, or for keeping a gun in my vehicle. 

Employers can make this a policy, and if you wish to keep your job and stay out of trouble you might want to abide by their request. KRS 237.106 states that

An employer that fires, disciplines, demotes, or otherwise punishes an employee who is lawfully exercising a right guaranteed by this section and who is engaging in conduct in compliance with this statute shall be liable in civil damages. An employee may seek and the court shall grant an injunction against an employer who is violating the provisions of this section when it is found that the employee is in compliance with the provisions of this section.

From my point of view, this can be interrupted as this. If your employer does not have a posted no gun policy, or if you have not signed a policy stating that you agree not carry or posses a firearm on their property that they can not legally fire you. Now with that being said, there is a bit of fine print to be read. Most big businesses will have a no weapon policy that you must abide by. If you chose not to abide by their policy, they can fire you for not following that policy. If there is not a policy in place, then you SHOULD be able to carry or posses a firearm in your vehicle (provided that you are legally allowed to possess a firearm)

Obviously if you are not legally able to carry due to a state or federal law restriction this will not apply to you; however, if you are a KY CCDW permit holder, you obviously qualify to carry.

 

Please read the full KRS 237.106 quoted below:

237.106 Right of employees and other persons to possess firearms in vehicle —
Employer liable for denying right — Exceptions.
(1) No person, including but not limited to an employer, who is the owner, lessee, or
occupant of real property shall prohibit any person who is legally entitled to possess
a firearm from possessing a firearm, part of a firearm, ammunition, or ammunition
component in a vehicle on the property.
(2) A person, including but not limited to an employer, who owns, leases, or otherwise
occupies real property may prevent a person who is prohibited by state or federal
law from possessing a firearm or ammunition from possessing a firearm or
ammunition on the property.
(3) A firearm may be removed from the vehicle or handled in the case of self-defense,
defense of another, defense of property, or as authorized by the owner, lessee, or
occupant of the property.
(4) An employer that fires, disciplines, demotes, or otherwise punishes an employee
who is lawfully exercising a right guaranteed by this section and who is engaging in
conduct in compliance with this statute shall be liable in civil damages. An
employee may seek and the court shall grant an injunction against an employer who
is violating the provisions of this section when it is found that the employee is in
compliance with the provisions of this section.
(5) The provisions of this section shall not apply to any real property:
(a) Owned, leased, or occupied by the United States government, upon which the
possession or carrying of firearms is prohibited or controlled;
(b) Of a detention facility as defined in KRS 520.010; or
(c) Where a section of the Kentucky Revised Statutes specifically prohibits
possession or carrying of firearms on the property.
Effective: July 12, 2006
History: Created 2006 Ky. Acts ch. 240, sec. 8, effective July 12, 2006.

Please keep in mind that the information posted in this article is not intended to be used as a legal reference and may not be 100% accurate. This article is just an opinion of the author.